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Lusty Broadside Ballads & Playford Dances from 17th Century England - City Waites; Dave Chatterley (hurdygurdy); Ian Gammie (violin); Mike Sargeant (bagpipes); Robin Jeffrey (lute);...
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Track Listing
  1. Bobbing Joe
  2. Brooms for Old Shoes, song
  3. The Traders Medley, ballad
  4. The Kind Country Lovers (Diddle Diddle), broadside ballad (Pepys Collection)
  5. We be soldiers three, madrigal
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  1. Bobbing Joe
  2. Brooms for Old Shoes, song
  3. The Traders Medley, ballad
  4. The Kind Country Lovers (Diddle Diddle), broadside ballad (Pepys Collection)
  5. We be soldiers three, madrigal
  6. Medley of Three Branles: Branle (Gervaise) / Branle (Du Tertre) / Branle (Susato)
  7. There Were Three Ravens, for voice(s) & ensemble
  8. Tomorrow the Fox Will Come to Town
  9. My Dog and I, broadside ballad
  10. Merry, Merry Milkmaids
  11. Newcastle (The English Dancing Master, 1651)
  12. The Northern Lasse's Lamentation
  13. The Jovial Broom Man, broadside ballad (a.k.a. "The Slow Men of London"; tune of Jamaica)
  14. Work(s): Nine Pins / Jenny Pluck Pears / Half Hanekin
  15. Yonder Comes a Courteous Knight (The Baffled Kight), for 4 voices
  16. Paul's Wharfe, dance (Playford's English Dancing Master, 1651)
  17. Tobacco Is an Indian Weed, ballad
  18. You Lasses and Lads, ballad
  19. Jockey's Lamentation, ballad
  20. Blue Cap, traditional dance melody (Playford's English Dancing Master, 1651)
  21. The Crost People, broadside ballad (a.k.a. "A Good Misfortune" and "The Crost Couple") (Roxburghe Collection)
  22. The Farmer's Curst Wife, folk song
  23. Lumps of Pudding (from the collection "Wit and Mirth or Pills to Purge Melancholy")
  24. The Broom of Cowdenknows, folk song
  25. Work(s): The Chirping of the Lark / Parsons Farewell
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Bawdy songs have an ancient and venerable history -- some of the earliest Trouvère songs from the twelfth century have lyrics that would shock delicate sensibilities -- and the English have a particularly strong record of bawdy repertoire. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, broadside ballads (single sheets with a text and an indication of the popular tune to which it was to be sung) were widely distributed and hugely popular. The music to be performed with the texts included familiar folk songs as well as ...

Lusty Broadside Ballads & Playford Dances from 17th Century England 2015, Alto

UPC: 5055354412752

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